Liam Lynch commemoration, 2017

On Sunday 16th July the annual Liam Lynch commemoration was held in the Knockmealdown Mountains, above Goatenbridge in County Tipperary.

Well attended, we heard a lament played by Padraig O Cadhain, a little of which is here:

The oration was delivered by Donnchadh Ó Laoghaire, the final part of which is here:

Donnchadh reminded us that it is clear to all who look rationally and objectively at the present state of the ‘Republic’ of Ireland that the vision of 1916 and of 1919 has not been fulfilled.

Below are some of the photographs taken at the event, held as always in beautiful Irish July sunshine.

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Annual Liam Lynch Commemoration

COMMUNITY ANNOUNCEMENT

2017-07-16

Annual Liam Lynch Commemoration

Tipperary Republican Commemoration Committee cordially invite all to the annual General Liam Lynch commemoration:

Goatenbridge, Co. Tipperary, 2017-07-16.

Guest speaker will be Donnchadh Ó Laoghaire TD of Sinn Féin (Cork South Central).

Music on the day will be provided by Carrick-on-Suir Republican Flute Band.

Assemble at 14:30. Refreshments provided afterwards.

All are welcome.

– Tipperary Republican Commemoration Committee

ENDS

 

Bodenstown 2017: Advancing towards Irish Unity – in the United Irish tradition

“Every Irish citizen is entitled to a home, an education, comprehensive health care free at the point of delivery, and, equal pay for equal work.” – Declan Kearney.

“To break the connection with England…and to assert the independence of my country, these were my objects. To unite the whole people of Ireland… and to substitute the common name of Irishman, in place of Protestant, Catholic and dissenter, these were my means.” – Wolfe Tone.


This is the address by Declan Kearney at Bodenstown 2017: Advancing towards Irish Unity – in the United Irish tradition

This time 220 years ago Ireland was in the midst of dramatic political and revolutionary change.

It was described as ‘The time of the Hurry’ in the poem ‘The man from God knows where’ dedicated to Thomas Russell.

The United Irishmen were the engine of that change.

Declan Kearney, Sinn Féin National Chairperson.

They took their inspiration from the new democratic and egalitarian ideals of the American and French revolutions.

They were Republican separatists committed to the promotion of anti-sectarianism, fraternity and equality.

They forged alliances across Irish society and mounted an unprecedented military insurgency in every Province.

In my own county the United Irishmen took control of towns like Randalstown and Ballymena. Local United Irish leaders such as Henry Joy McCracken, Roddy McCorley and William Orr remain household names to this day.

Jemmy Hope “The Weaver” from Templepatrick and his farseeing revolutionary vision became an ideological reference point for Fintan Lawlor and later generations of Irish Revolutionaries.

These and others personified the central tenet of emergent Irish Republicanism – the unity of Protestant, Catholic and dissenter.

Wolfe Tone famously summarised the United Irish Republican programme:

To break the connection with England…and to assert the independence of my country, these were my objects. To unite the whole people of Ireland… and to substitute the common name of Irishman, in place of Protestant, Catholic and dissenter, these were my means.”

As modern day Irish Republicans in the tradition of Tone, we are dedicated to the establishment of a national Republic, built upon equality, fraternity, unity and reconciliation between all citizens in Ireland.

Our primary aim is for an agreed, multicultural united Ireland, which celebrates diversity and equality, and shuns bigotry and discrimination.

Sinn Féin stands against all forms of sectarianism, racism, homophobia, sexism, and intolerance in society.

Today’s Ireland is one of huge social change and political realignment.

Partition continues to be the central fault line at the heart of Irish politics and society.

The imposition of the Brexit decision upon the people of the six counties has now magnified that fault line.

We are clear; Brexit is a by-product of partition and continued British jurisdiction in the North of our country.

It has now become a catalyst for a new realignment of politics in Ireland; in relations between this island and Britain: and, it is redefining politics in the British State and Europe itself.

Irish Unity has become central to the political discourse. 

Next Saturday in Belfast at the Waterfront our party will host a major national conference on Irish Unity to build on that discussion.

Many citizens are now looking beyond the Brexit fall out and towards new constitutional and political opportunities.

In the North, greater numbers of ordinary people are now more engaged with politics.

Young people have become increasingly politicised.

All that is reflected in the Assembly and General election results in March and just last week.

The election of 27 Sinn Féin MLA’s and 7 MPs with 239,000 votes is an historic high in electoral support for our party, and for progressive politics.

I want to thank every activist and supporter and all their families who contributed to these spectacular achievements; and also to all of our voters.

There is a building momentum for Irish Unity and in support of anti-unionist and progressive politics.

There is also a new, popular expectation of real, and substantial political change.

The people of the North have spoken.

Sinn Féin respects the mandate secured by the DUP.

But make no mistake Sinn Féin’s electoral mandate is a vindication of our pledge that there will be no return to the status quo: and I repeat; no citizen or section of society will be put to the back of the bus again.

In 1967 our parents and grandparents and others in this gathering set out to demand civil rights in the North. They were beaten and shot off the streets.

Fifty years later an equality revolution is happening in the six counties and it is being led by young people.

Agus tá siad tiomanta agus diongbhailte. Tá siad dearg le fearg agus tá muid go léir dearg le fearg.

For the first time since partition electoral support for political unionism has fallen below 50%.

These are the new realities.

And this is the new context for the current round of political talks.

Let us be clear – the political crisis in the North can be resolved.

The political institutions can be re-established.

However, that means the DUP and British government need to get the message – which they have ignored since Martin McGuinness’ resignation on 9th January.

So I will spell it out.

The equality and rights agenda is not negotiable.

Agreements previously made on equality, rights, parity of esteem and legacy must be implemented.

The Good Friday Agreement cannot be unpicked.

The political institutions must not be misused to advance institutionalised bigotry.

Continued refusal by the DUP and British government to accept these fundamental positions will create only one outcome: a future of permanent political instability.

The DUP have spent the last week in talks with the British Government trying to strike a deal which will keep the Tories in power.

As with Brexit, any deal with Tories will be bad for the economy, public services and for citizens.

This Tory government cares as little for working-class unionists as it does for working-class republicans.

Working-class unionists did not vote for Tories.

The DUP leadership know that. They know the north is of no consequence in Westminster.

Even Edward Carson recognised this nearly 100 years ago. He said:

“What a fool I was… in the political game that was to get the Conservative party into power.”

The central fact is the political process in the North remains overshadowed by financial scandals.

That is why Sinn Féin stood the DUP leader down from her position last January.

The focus on her future role in an Executive is completely misdirected and premature.

That discussion will only arise when there is an acceptable implementation plan to restore public confidence in the political process and ensures that the institutions will work on the basis of proper power sharing, equality, respect and integrity.

This is a serious situation, which demands a serious focus by all parties.

It is not a game, and it is certainly not a dance.

If the DUP really wants to go into the Executive, that party needs to decide whether it is now prepared to embrace a rights-based approach to government in the North.

Instead of pretending that a crisis does not really exist, the DUP should get with the programme.

If the DUP imagines it can wind back the clock, with a Tory side deal or not, and reestablish the institutions without adherence to equality and rights, then the DUP is indeed living in a fool’s paradise.

As for the two governments, instead of talking up the prospect of a successful outcome to these talks, they and the DUP should reread Martin McGuinness’ resignation letter on the 9th January.

It sets out exactly what is required to restore public confidence, and to create the conditions for proper government in the North.

We don’t need optical illusions; we expect change!

The new Irish government now carries a huge responsibility.

The failure of the last Irish government to fulfil its obligations as a co-guarantor for the Good Friday Agreement is a national scandal.

This dereliction of political leadership must end.

The new Taoiseach and his administration should now publicly disassociate itself from the pro-unionist, partisan position of the British government.

This Irish government should bring forward a comprehensive plan for Irish reunification, including:

     – A joint Oireachtas committee on preparing for Irish unity;

     – A government White Paper on national reunification; 

     – And, specific proposals for a unity referendum on the island.

This month 40 years ago and here at Tone’s grave our comrade Jimmy Drumm correctly observed that the achievement of national and social liberation relied upon the development of a popular progressive movement for change throughout Ireland.

Today we live in an Ireland of endemic financial scandal, political corruption, gombeen elites, discrimination and sectarianism.

The strategic position articulated by Jimmy Drumm in 1977 is now more relevant than ever.

The austerity programmes imposed by Fine Gael and the British Tories have entrenched social inequality, both North and South.

None of our children should have to live in fear from poverty or austerity; inequality or discrimination; or from intolerance or sectarianism.

Social inequality is the antithesis of values enshrined in the 1916 Proclamation and the democratic programme of 1919.

Every Irish citizen is entitled to a home, an education, comprehensive health care free at the point of delivery, and, equal pay for equal work.

Instead social inequality, political corruption and financial scandal have become bywords for public policy under Fine Gael.

The new Taoiseach seems determined to take his government further to the right.

If that is his intention, then he should call a general election now, and let the people cast its verdict on that political programme.

In those circumstances Sinn Féin will go forward with our progressive political agenda.

We know where we stand, and it’s not with the gombeen men, the crooks, or fat cats.

To paraphrase Tone Sinn Féin stands with:

That numerous and respectable class of the community, the men of no property.”

Irish unity has never been more achievable. 

But that goal is only inevitable when Republicans successfully persuade sufficient numbers of our people that an agreed, united Ireland will serve their interests.

The refusal of significant sections of political unionism to embrace a shared future, and divisions caused by deep-seated sectarianism, create enormous challenges for Republicans.

Yet despite that, we must continue to show generosity of spirit, and reassurance to our unionist neighbours in the North.

As agents of change it is up to us to reach into the wider unionist constituency.

As republicans in the United Irish tradition we have to demonstrate how their rights, traditions, and identity will be accommodated in a new constitutional framework of an agreed Ireland.

It is for us to convince them that it is far better for Irish unionists to exert their influence over a progressive Ireland, instead of being reduced to stage props for a right-wing British Tory government.

Sinn Féin’s policies on reconciliation and anti-sectarianism represent genuine contributions towards the development of reconciliation between Republicans and unionists, within Irish society, and, between Ireland and Britain.

These need to be internalised and mainstreamed within our political work, both North and South.

Our generation of Republicans are history makers.

Martin McGuinness atá anois ar shlí na fírinne, and whom we greatly miss here today, as well as others in our leadership, have brought us to this point.

Now it is for the rest of us to finish that work.

We must become the nation builders.

We must continue the transformation of Irish society.

Meeting these responsibilities requires a step change in our party.

We need to be always strategically focused, cohesive, flexible and creative.

Let us be clear: building popular support and political strength is not a plan for opposition.

Our political strategy is a road map for governmental power.

So that means Sinn Féin being in government North and South.

This is our road map to achieving national democracy and a united Ireland.

But being in government is not a vanity contest.

This party is not interested in acting as a prop for the status quo North or South.

Political institutions are not ends in themselves: they should be made to work as the means to make positive change.

And of course, we must avoid being defined by the nature of the political institutions.

Sinn Féin participation in the Dáil, Assembly, all-Ireland institutions and European Parliament must be at the heart of a broader momentum for political and social change in Ireland.

If change is to be people centred, then change must be driven by the people.

A popular democratic movement for transformation needs to be developed across Ireland.

That is a progressive coalition of political, civic, community, cultural and labour activists united in support of economic democracy, sustainable public services, equality, rights, and the welfare of citizens.

These are the means of modern Republicans today.

Ireland is in transition. Our party is in transition.

The process of leadership succession has already commenced.

We have begun to implement a ten-year plan to regenerate our party with more youth and women; and enhanced skills and capacity.

Mar sin, más cearta, cothromas agus Poblacht atá uaibh –  ná habraigí é – eagraigí, tógaigí, agus déanaigí é.

Bígí línne.

If you want equality and rights – if you want fairness in Irish society:

If you really want a Republic – then just don’t vote Sinn Féin:

Join Sinn Féin – and get your family and friends to do the same.

We continue to take our inspiration from Tone.

This afternoon in Bodenstown we stand resolute in the tradition of Henry Joy McCracken, William Orr, Roddy McCorley, Jemmy Hope, Betsy Gray and Mary-Anne McCracken.

Now let us go forward reenergised and confident, to mobilise and organise, and to achieve national independence and Irish Unity.

“Fianna Fáil holds Ireland in a perpetual state of dysfunction” (images)

(and forget the blood and horror of their own past)

Ciara McCormack, Cllr Martin Browne, Joanne Cleere.
At the 2017 George Plant commemoration the Oration was delivered by Ciara McCormack, in which she reminded us that “Fianna Fáil are the ever constant chameleon that holds Ireland in a perpetual state of dysfunction”.

At the Annual Easter commemoration of George Plant, Ciara McCormack delivered a powerful account of the fate of George Plant at the dishonest hands of Fianna Fáil, and the fate of the southern ‘Republic’.

The oration reminded the large crowd in attendance of the duplicity of Fianna Fáil and the harm that group have done to our State and to our Nation. As she reminded us, “while Fianna Fáil continually lament and lambast Sinn Féin about the horrors of armed conflict, they conveniently forget the blood and horror of their own past. They are the ever constant chameleon that holds Ireland in a perpetual state of dysfunction”.

The full oration is available in PDF format here:

2017-04-16-CiaraMcCormack-GeorgePlant-Oration

There are some photos available here:

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Selective ‘Outrage’ over McGuinness nomination for the Tipperary Peace Prize is hypocritical and crass

Of late, considerable coverage has been devoted to Martin McGuinness’ nomination for the Tipperary Peace Prize, most notably in the Tipperary Star, which was headlined with “ANGER MOUNTS” on its front page, as well as to referring to the supposed ‘outrage’ of McGuinness being nominated for such an award.

John Kerry (previous recipient of Tipperary Peace Prize) with RPG (rocket propelled grenade) during the Vietnam War.

To contend that McGuinness is ‘unfit’ to be recognised for his extraordinary peace-building endeavours in the North of Ireland on account of his involvement in the IRA is quite simply ridiculous and utterly obtuse. Such critics would do well to note that last year’s recipient, was former US Secretary of State John Kerry. In addition to his tenure in that office which is difficult to describe as being either ‘pro-peace’ or ‘non-confrontational’, Mr Kerry was a combatant in the criminally destructive Vietnam War.

Though in the later stages of the Vietnam War John Kerry would receive acclaim – and deservingly so – as an anti-war whisteblower, it does not negate the fact that he was the captain of a boat unit that was engaged in an operation renowned for its aggression and cruelty towards Vietnamese villagers and fishermen. Nonetheless, Kerry’s Tipperary Peace Prize Award was presented with not so much as an iota of disquiet or opposition; that silence in comparison with hypocritical the response to Martin McGuinness’ recent nomination.

Martin McGuinness attends the funeral of a Republican Volunteer.

Martin McGuinness’ nomination for this award makes sense and is completely deserved. As a leader of the Republican movement, Martin has achieved breath-taking results in working towards peace and justice in an fraught political environment; this is a state of peace which, for whatever its flaws, is substantial, too often taken for granted, and once thought impossible.

Martin and Sinn Féin have worked tirelessly and always in good faith towards making this process permanent in spite of the disrespect too often afforded to them by other actors, whether that be the current contempt and chauvinism demonstrated by the Tory Brexiteers, the arrogance of bull-headed unionists or the habitual negligence of the Dublin government and its institutions.

Martin McGuinness with other known equality and peace activist, Nelson Mandela.

What’s more, it is not like Martin’s co-nominees are without controversy themselves. Amal Clooney, Amnesty International and the ‘White Helmets’ civil defence organisation occupy a very partisan position on the Syrian conflict. They explicitly lobby for a forceful international military intervention against the Syrian government. The White Helmets in particular have attracted especial notoriety for its dubious overlap with anti-government militias; that undermines its ostensible position as a politically neutral and civil humanitarian organisation.

It must also be stated that it is disappointing that the ongoing peace process in Colombia has received virtually no recognition from the Tipperary Peace Convention in contrast to the preponderance of attention focused on Syria. In one of the world’s longest ongoing conflicts – stretching five decades – Colombia is on the brink of attaining a concrete and lasting peace. In a country that is seen as one of the most dangerous places in the world to be a trade unionist or human rights activist, this is an not an opportunity that can be let slip.

Martin McGuinness has done business with every leader from the Unionist community, even those who would not naturally be courteous towards him.

Sinn Féin have worked closely with the FARC rebel group to offer their extensive and long-standing experience in conflict resolution, and President Michael D. Higgins has also shown commendable and progressive statesmanship recently, when he visited Colombia. In so doing, he became the first European head of state to visit a FARC guerrilla detachment at a demobilisation camp.

These traits of leadership, dialogue and reconciliation are principles that Martin McGuinness has demonstrated consistently; to obscure them is disingenuous. To deny them outright is dishonest.

After his lifetime of service, Sinn Féin’s Michelle O’Neill poses with Martin McGuinness after being announced as his replacement for the upcoming elections, at a news conference in Belfast, Northern Ireland January 23, 2017. (REUTERS/Clodagh Kilcoyne TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)

From: Sinn Féin Republican Youth Tipperary, Chairperson James Lyons.

Peadar Tóibín TD welcomes the introduction of the Famine Commemoration Bill

Sinn Féin TD for Meath West, Peadar Tóibín TD, has welcomed the introduction of a Bill seeking a fixed Commemoration Day for the famine. However, An Teachta Tóibín has expressed disappointment that Fine Gael cynically introduced it’s bill in a reluctant response to the similar Sinn Féin Bill introduced a few weeks ago.

Deputy Tóibín said:

“I welcome that this Bill will be introduced. It is shocking that, in response to a recent PQ that I submitted, we have learned that the Government still have not selected the day for this year, 2017, in which we will commemorate the Famine.

“Each year, citizens and community groups around the world seek to organise commemorative events to pay tribute and remember the most significant time of our nation’s history. They are frustrated by the Government’s inability to select the date in a neither fixed nor timely fashion.

“Currently, the commemoration date swings from between May to September each year meaning that planning and preparation, especially for those overseas is particularly difficult. This Bill will place the Famine Memorial Day on the second Sunday of May, the same date as was proposed by the Sinn Féin Bill.

“It is undoubtedly a positive development that the famine receives appropriate commemoration. It is, by far, the single most difficult and influential period of our history. I do believe it is enormously cynical that the government could not work with an opposition Bill but sought to replicate a Sinn Féin Bill for the purpose of having their own finger prints on the initiative.

“Regardless of this political shimmying, Sinn Féin is very supportive of the introduction of the Famine Commemoration Day Bill and the end to the annual certainty over the date of commemoration.”

Mná na hÉireann

Friday 28th October, Park Hotel, Clonmel

A gathering of strong Republican women who have lived in the shadows for too long and who have endured unimaginable pain, intimidation and suffering for our common cause which is freedom, equality and justice for all on the island. The speakers on the night shared their stories and let us have a glimpse into how it was and how it can still be.

The guest speakers on the night were: Martina Anderson M.E.P., Joan McDermott speaking on the Mother and Baby Scandal, Jennifer McCann ex POW, Mary Doyle North Belfast Councillor and survivor of the 1980 Hunger-strike.

The night was hosted by the Clonmel Sinn Féin Cumann – the George Plant Cumann – and was presented by Deputy Mayor Sinn Féin Councillor Catherine Carey.


Martina Anderson MEP

Mary Doyle

Joan McDermott

Jennifer McCann

Women Of The Nation

19:00, Friday 28th October, Park Hotel, Clonmel:

This will be a gathering of strong Republican women who have lived in the shadows for too long and who have endured unimaginable pain, intimidation and suffering for a common cause which is freedom, equality and justice for all in Ireland. The speakers on the night will share their stories and let us have a glimpse into how it was and how it can still be.

The guest speakers on the night will be: Martina Anderson M.E.P., Joan McDermott who will speak on the Mother and Baby Scandal, Jennifer McCann ex POW, Mary Doyle North Belfast Councillor and survivor of the 1980 Hungestrike.

The Mná na hÉireann Exhibtion will be on display.

The night will be hosted by the Clonmel Sinn Féin Cumann – the George Plant Cumann – and will be presented by Deputy Mayor Sinn Féin Councillor Catherine Carey.

So please join us at the Clonmel Park Hotel on October 28th 2016.

RUNNING ORDER FOR THE WEEKEND:
OCTOBER 28th 2016
19.00: Ladies enter the room
19.05 Guests and speakers welcomed to the event
19.10: Proclamation of the Irish Republic Read by Helen
19.15 Chairperson Niamh Introduces Martina Anderson M.E.P.
19.30 Mise Eire sung by Lilian Fitzpatrick.
19.35 Joan McDermott, Survivor of Mother and Baby Scandal
19.50: Mary Doyle, ex POW
20.05: Sniper’s Promise played by Gundy Humphries on the flute
20.10: Jennifer McCann MLA, ex POW
20.25: Questions and Answers chaired by Cllr Catherine Carey
21.00: Close with National Anthem sung by Lilian Fitzpatrick.
OCTOBER 29th 2016
Midday: Wreath laying at Manchester Martyrs Monument
14.00 Refreshments at Fozzy’s

poster

Seán Treacy Commemoration 2016

Seán Treacy Commemoration 2016

October 16th 2016

Annual Seán Treacy Commemoration, Kilfeacle, Co. Tipperary.

Cathaoirleach: Kevin Brunnick.

Guest speaker is Eóin Ó Broin.

Assemble 14:30 for 15:00.

Music provided by Carrick-on-Suir RFB.


You can read about Seán Treacy on Wikipedia here.


Photographs of Liam Lynch Commemoration 2016

2016-07-17

Thíos tá pictúirí ó comóradh General Liam Lynch a tharla inniu i Goatenbridge, Tiobraid Árann. Bhí an banna ó Carrick-on-Suir ann agus íontach, mar is gnáth.

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